Summer Reading: Get Your Copy of “Tasting Cider”

by Sip Northwest

When travel season arrives, a mandatory item to a well-curated packing list — outside of which drinks you are bringing…

RECENT Cider ARTICLES

While barbecuing is a staple of summer, the team at My Family Tradition (MFT) in Boise, Idaho, is livening up an old ritual with their Blackberry Boom BBQ Sauce. Originally a storied family recipe, owner Scott Tharp refined the sauce using natural ingredients and a splash (or two) of the Blackberry Boom cider from fellow Boise artisan Meriwether Cider, all while keeping with the same taste that has been in his family for decades.

If you haven’t yet hopped on the cider train, now is the time. Over the past decade, the industry has grown from just a handful of orchard-based producers to one of the most remarkable success stories in craft beverage — and this month, you’ll have the opportunity to see exactly where the industry’s heading during the seventh-annual Oregon Cider Week, sponsored by the Northwest Cider Association.

Is the United Kingdom cider’s spiritual home? For many cider pundits, the answer is a resounding yes. Dating as far back as 1000 BC, evidence suggests that Celtic Britons were making and drinking a form of cider pressed from crab apples. Where the beverage truly originated is still up for debate. But, what’s undeniable is the impact the U.K. has on the world of cider. The U.K.

With a whole lot of TLC, Locust Cider transforms seemingly humble “cull” eating apples (those that would otherwise be rejected due to surface imperfections but whose juice still packs a punch) into highly sessionable cans. Jason Spears, co-founder of the Woodinville, Washington, cidery (along with his brother, Patrick), is at the helm of the small yet ass-kicking team behind each resulting batch.

Hood River, Oregon, is the gateway from Portland to Mount Hood National Forest and all the summer adventures therein. But this small riverside city is a windsurfing, paddling, dining and drinking destination in its own right. As the weather gets warmer and more people get outside, stopping for dinner in Hood River on your way back to Portland can become less a relaxing break, and more of a crowded hassle.

It is no secret the Northwest cider scene is booming like never before — recently released data says that regional and local cider sales for 2016 were up nearly 50 percent over the year prior. With spring officially taking hold yesterday and sunny days replacing winter rains, sipping on a chilled local cider sounds pretty enticing. At these newly opened, or soon-to-open, cideries, there are numerous ways and possibilities to sip on a taste of the region.
1859 Cider Co.

Happy International Women’s Day! In honor of this day and March being Women’s History Month, Sip Northwest magazine has teamed up with Seattle’s acclaimed Ethan Stowell Restaurants (ESR) for a night celebrating women in food, drink and leadership.

Welcome back to Bar Tab, our editor’s weekly selection of what to drink in the Northwest now. This week, we are introducing the latest production to our Sip Publishing family — Sip’s Wine Guide: British Columbia. Our inaugural venture into wine tourism magazines, the publication has a heightened focused on all that is grape-made and fermented in Canada’s most western province.

Meriwether Cider’s Molly Leadbetter belongs to a unique team of co-owners: her father, her mother and her sister. Then again, the tight-knit community of homegrown entrepreneurs in the greater Boise, Idaho, area is already a bit like a family.
Leadbetter explains that Meriwether’s commitment to its community, paired with the ongoing intention to remain passionate and adventurous while only producing ciders the family would be proud to drink, is exactly what has kept the label chugging along.

 
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